Recently in Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Category

Oversupply Litigation Milestone: FERC Approves BPA Oversupply Management Protocol

October 20, 2014

At its monthly meeting last week, the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission ("FERC") approved the Bonneville Power Administration's "Oversupply Management Protocol," marking a major litigation milestone in Bonneville's controversial efforts to address those periods when the combined output of federal dams and wind generation in the Pacific Northwest exceeds electric demand in the region and in areas where power can be exported. While FERC's decision does not resolve the litigation, it is a major step toward final resolution of the matter.

As we have previously discussed at length, the oversupply problem arises when heavy spring runoff in the Columbia Basin coincides with high spring-time winds, producing a simultaneous surge in power production from the region's hydroelectric dams and wind generators. While Bonneville can generally manage these events through, for example, backing down the region's thermal generators and providing them with free or nearly-free replacement power from federal dams, this solution does not work for wind generation. Even when output is replaced with free or low-cost power, forced curtailments of wind generation can impose substantial costs on wind generators from lost tax credits based on production, as well as lost RECs and, in some cases, violations of contractual minimum production requirements.

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Regulators Revolve: FERC Says Hello to Honorable, Ciao to Norris

September 12, 2014

Earlier this week, the White House officially nominated Collette Honorable to become the next Commissioner of the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission ("FERC"). Ms. Honorable is currently Chairman of the Arkansas Public Service Commission and President of the National Association of Regulatory Utility Commissioners. If confirmed by the U.S. Senate, Ms. Honorable would fill the term of Commissioner John Norris, who left FERC in August to become minister-counseler for the U.S. Department of Agriculture at the U.S. Embassy in Rome. Ms. Honorable would serve the remaining three years of Commissioner Norris's term, which expires in 2017.

Ms. Honorable would bring considerable expertise in natural gas matters, especially pipeline safety, to the Commission. FERC's focus in recent years has been on electricity matters such as demand response, integration of renewable resources, and improving transmission planning. Ms. Honorable's nomination may bring a greater focus back to natural gas issues, and may also help the Commission resolve issues straddling the natural gas and electricity markets, such as the coordination of gas and electric trading days and the expansion of gas pipeline capacity to accommodate the nation's expanding natural gas generation fleet.

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Latest Round in PURPA Wars: Fifth Circuit Upholds Texas Rule Limiting PURPA Rights of Wind Generators

September 11, 2014

Earlier this week, the United States Court of Appeals for the Fifth Circuit issued the latest salvo in the PURPA wind wars, this time handing wind producers a painful defeat. The Fifth Circuit's opinion upholds a rule issued by the Public Utility Commission of Texas ("PUCT") preventing non-firm resources from forming Legally Enforceable Obligations under PURPA. If the Fifth Circuit opinion stands, it could limit the ability of wind producers to obtain access to electricity markets under PURPA (the Public Utility Regulatory Policies Act), a 1978 law aimed at allowing small independent and renewable energy producers (referred to as "Qualifying Facilities" or "QFs") access to electricity markets controlled by regulated utility monopolies.

The Fifth Circuit opinion, however, may not be the final word. The Fifth Circuit's opinion is at odds with the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission's ("FERC") 2009 declaratory order in the same dispute, which found the PUCT rule to be contrary to FERC regulations requiring that "[e]ach qualifying facility shall have" the option to sell energy under a "legally enforceable obligation." In addition, a lengthy dissenting opinion issued by Judge Edward C. Prado suggests that the majority's reasoning may be vulnerable, both in its primary conclusion and in supporting conclusions related to the degree of deference owed to FERC's interpretation of PURPA and federal regulations.

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Join GTH at the Washington Future Energy Conference

September 9, 2014

Please join us at the Washington Future Energy Conference on November 5. Gordon Thomas Honeywell is proud to be a major sponsor of this event. Now in its fifth year, the Future Energy Conference brings together energy innovators, utilities, scientists, investors, and many others to discuss the future of the energy industry in our state.

Speakers include GTH partner Eric Christensen, who will moderate a panel discussing the electrification of Washington's transportation system. The panel will include Steve Marshall of the Center for Advanced Transportation and Energy Solutions, Charles Knutson, Senior Policy Advisor to Washington Governor Jay Inslee, and John McCoy, Legislative Director for the Seattle Electric Vehicle Association.

We look forward to seeing you November 5.

U.S. Appeals Court Concludes FERC Lacks Authority to Fine Federal Entities for Reliability Violations

August 22, 2014

In a ruling that could have far-reaching implications for the electric reliability here in the Pacific Northwest, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit today found that the Federal Power Act does not authorize the Southwest Power Administration ("SWPA") to pay fines for admitted violations of mandatory electric reliability standards.

The decision turns on the doctrine of sovereign immunity. In its modern form, the doctrine bars federal government liability unless Congress provides a clearly-expressed statutory waiver of sovereign immunity. Today's decision applies this doctrine to Section 215 of the Federal Power Act, the provision Congress added to the Act in 2005 to create a system of mandatory electric reliability standards. Section 215 authorizes the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission ("FERC") to impose fines on "users, owners and operators" of the Bulk Electric System if they violate electric reliability standards developed by the North American Electric Reliability Corporation ("NERC"). Carefully parsing the language of Section 215, today's decision finds no clear expression of Congressional intent to allow federal entities such as SWPA to pay fines for violations of reliability standards.

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Milestone in Transmission Regulation: U.S. Court of Appeals Upholds Order No. 1000

August 18, 2014

On Friday, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit rejected a host of challenges to the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission's ("FERC") Order No. 1000, upholding the order in its entirety. As we've previously discussed, Order No. 1000 aims to create a level regulatory playing field for independent transmission developers, thus encouraging new sources of badly-needed investment in the nation's transmission infrastructure. The D.C. Circuit's 97-page opinion upholding the order represents an important milestone in the evolution of regulation in the electric industry.

Order No. 1000 changed the planning and cost allocation regime for interstate transmission projects in three major requirements:

(1) Each FERC-jurisdictional transmission provider must participate in a regional transmission planning process that identifies the most cost-effective regional and inter-regional transmission projects, and provides for a method of cost-allocation for the selected projects meeting six specific principles. Independent transmission developers and other non-incumbents need not participate in this process, but it must be open to their participation.

(2) The planning process must provide for transmission expansion driven by public policy requirements, along with economic and reliability needs. State renewable portfolio standards and other public policies favoring the development of renewable energy are the largest public policy factor driving the need for new transmission.

(3) The federal "right of first refusal" ("ROFR") must be removed from FERC-approved transmission tariffs. The ROFR allows incumbent utilities to construct transmission projects proposed by other entities within the incumbents' service territories. FERC views this as a major barrier to entry for independent transmission developers, whose investment in planning and permitting is essentially wiped out if the incumbent exercises its ROFR. Although not common in the Northwest, the ROFR requirement proved extremely controversial in other parts of the country.

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U.S. Senate Confirms Norman Bay and Cheryl LeFleur as FERC Commissioners

July 15, 2014

The United States Senate today confirmed President Obama's nominations of Cheryl A. LeFleur and Norman Bay to serve on the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission. Commissioner LeFleur has served on the Commission since 2010 and the confirmation will allow her to serve a full five-year term. Mr. Bay will replace former Chairman Jon Wellinghoff.

Mr. Bay has been the Director of FERC's Office of Enforcement since 2009. In that capacity, he was responsible for a substantial rise in that office's profile. For example, as a result of an Office of Enforcement investigation of market manipulation in the West, FERC last year sought nearly $500 million in penalties against Barclays Bank and certain of its power traders, and $410 million against JP Morgan.

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Seventh Circuit Rejects FERC's Cost-Spreading Mechanism for High-Voltage Transmission, Raising Questions for the Pacific Northwest

July 1, 2014

Last week, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Seventh Circuit once again rejected a cost-spreading mechanism developed by the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission ("FERC") for high-voltage transmission facilities constructed in the PJM Interconnection. While PJM is located on the opposite coast, the Seventh Circuit's decision may nonetheless have important implications for transmission construction here in the Pacific Northwest.

The basic problem FERC has wrestled with is that utilities in the eastern end of PJM's footprint in the heavily-populated mid-Atlantic region will benefit disproportionately from construction of high-voltage transmission. By contrast, utilities in the western portion of PJM will receive only modest benefits from high-voltage transmission construction, which is currently driven largely by the need to improve reliability in the east. FERC has been wrestling with this problem for more than seven years, with final resolution likely several years away. In the Northwest, the problem is a mirror image of PJM -- congestion and reliability problems are largely in population centers along the West Coast, meaning that high-voltage transmission upgrades are likely to disproportionately benefit utilities serving these areas.

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Six GTH Energy and Environmental Named Washington "Super Lawyers"

June 23, 2014

We're pleased to announce that nineteen Gordon Thomas Honeywell attorneys have been named 2014 Washington Super Lawyers, including six members of our Energy, Telecommunications & Utilities and Environmental & Natural Resources practice groups.

The "Super Lawyers" practicing in our energy, environmental, and natural resources areas are Margaret Archer, Eric Christensen, Don Cohen, Brad Jones, and Bill Lynn. In addition, practice member Bill West has been named a "Rising Star."

"Super Lawyers" are selected through a process of peer review and independent evaluation, and represent the top five percent of practitioners in the State of Washington.

FERC Approves Energy Imbalance Market Tariffs, Paving Way for October Start-Up

June 20, 2014

At its monthly meeting yesterday, the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission ("FERC") approved tariffs that will allow the western Energy Imbalance Market ("EIM") to open as planned on October 1, 2014. The EIM is designed to allow economic dispatch at five-minute intervals of energy balancing resources in the footprint of participating utilities. The EIM is one of a number of initiatives undertaken by utilities in the West to address the problems created by the rapid expansion of non-dispatchable wind and solar resources. Because these resources produce output that can be both highly variable and unpredictable, they have created increasing demand for balancing resources that can respond rapidly to changes in generation output to maintain the balance between generation supply and electric demand necessary for reliable operation of the electric system.

Yesterday's FERC orders approve the EIM proposed jointly by PacifiCorp and the California Independent System Operator ("Cal-ISO"). The PacifiCorp-ISO EIM will employ the Cal-ISO's existing five-minute market mechanism to dispatch balancing resources in the EIM's footprint. Initially, the EIM will dispatch resources within California, as well as within the two balancing authorities operated by PacifiCorp, which are centered on its service territories in the Pacific Northwest and Utah. Participation in the EIM is voluntary and the system is designed to allow expansion through addition of new utility participants.

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FERC Proposes To Clarify Open Access Obligations for Owners of Generator Tie Lines

May 19, 2014

In a proposal that should clarify federal rules concern access to generator tie-lines, and therefore provide assurance to project developers and their financial backers, the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission ("FERC") at last week's monthly meeting proposed new rules to govern third-party access to such tie-lines. While at first blush, this issue may seem obscure, it has far-reaching consequences for both open access to and investment in the nation's electric system. The proposed rule also clarifies how FERC will reconcile two of its most important policy goals -- investment in new generation resources and open access to the nation's transmission grid.

The proposed rules are important because generator tie-lines often cover hundreds of miles and operate at extremely high voltages, especially when delivering power from generation resources located in remote, rural areas that otherwise have limited access to the backbone transmission grid. The proposed rules are therefore particularly important for wind generation and utility-scale solar, where the best resources are often located far from existing transmission lines. FERC's proposal notes several cases where tie-lines to link, for example, large wind generation projects to the grid span hundreds of miles and operate at voltages as high as 345-kV, and therefore look much like backbone transmission assets.

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Who Holds the Almighty and Powerful Ring? 13 Steps for Utility Cyber Security Protection

May 13, 2014

We are happy to announce that Eric Christensen and Maj. Gen. (Ret.) Tim Lowenberg of GTH-Governmental Affairs have published the cover story in the May 2014 Northwest Public Power Association Bulletin. Here is a link to the article on the NWPPA's website. The text of the article follows:

Cover Story
Who Holds the Almighty and Powerful Ring in the Cyber World?
Thirteen Steps for Utility Cybersecurity Protection


By
Eric Christensen, Partner
Gordon Thomas Honeywell

and

Maj. Gen. (Ret.) Tim Lowenberg, Vice President
Gordon Thomas Honeywell Governmental Affairs

While computer and internet technology create enormous benefits for twenty-first century utilities, they also expose utilities to new and sinister cyber threats. For utility managers, entering the cyber world can feel like entering J.R.R. Tolkien's "Middle Earth", a strange land filled with treacherous creatures like orcs, ring-wraiths, and wargs. Like Middle Earth, the cyber world is inhabited by peculiar and threatening forces ranging from amateur hackers to organized criminal enterprises searching for valuable financial information to politically motivated actors and nation-states capable of using malicious computer codes as weapons systems. And like Gollum, the hobbit twisted beyond all recognition by the power of the One Ring, threats in the cyber world often go undetected, arise from nebulous but nefarious motives and can unleash powerful, destructive effects beyond all expectation.

In light of the near-universal consensus among defense analysts, policy makers and computer experts that the electric utility sector is among the most vulnerable of sectors to cyber-attacks, how should utility managers address these threats? We recommend the following thirteen steps that all utilities, regardless of size, should take to mitigate risk in the complex and ever changing world of cyber-security.

Step 1: NIST Cybersecurity Framework
On February 12, 2014, the National Institute of Standards and Technology ("NIST") released the first version of its Framework for Improving Critical Infrastructure Cybersecurity. The Framework, issued in response to President Obama's Executive Order No. 13636, is intended to create common, voluntary industry standards and best practices for addressing cyber-security threats. The Framework provides a standardized approach for identifying cyber-security threats and protecting organizations against those threats through technological fixes and education of management and front-line operators. While the Framework is an ongoing and evolving document, it is a useful starting point for developing a cyber security strategy. The steps we recommend here are consistent with the NIST Framework.

Step 2: NERC CIP Standards
Because they are mandatory and violations can lead to substantial penalties, NERC Reliability Standards are, of course, of primary concern to electric utilities. NERC's Critical Infrastructure Protection ("CIP") standards define utility obligations to address threats in the cyber-security realm and should therefore be a prime focus of every utility. After a long period of flux, the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission ("FERC") in November 2013 adopted Version 5 of the CIP standards, with certain reservations. Utilities with "High and Medium Impact" assets (as defined in NERC's "BES Cyber Asset" definition) must come into compliance with Version 5 by April 2016 and those with "Low Impact" assets must come into compliance by April 2017. Utility managers should therefore pay careful attention to these standards, as well as refinements to the standards now under development in response to FERC's November 2013 order. In addition, NERC is conducting a pilot program with results due in the near future that should provide useful information for utility compliance managers.

Utility managers should also pay close attention to physical security standards. In reaction to damage caused by a sophisticated physical attack on the Metcalf Substation in California's Silicon Valley, FERC on March 7 ordered NERC to develop standards to secure key electrical facilities against physical attack. Compliance with these standards could be extremely expensive. In raising this concern, FERC Commissioner John Norris recently noted that just three utilities reported to him they may have to spend more than $500 million for physical security enhancements in the wake of the Metcalf incident. As is also obvious, under-reaction could prove even more costly for the utility and for our national security.

Step 3: Develop a Cyber-Security Strategy
In compliance with the NIST Framework and CIP standards, utility management should develop a cyber-security strategy that identifies cyber-risks, provides clear guidance and training to utility employees to effectively address those risks, and ensures the strategy is carried out and documented through continuous feedback to utility managers. As discussed below, it is important that the strategy include coordination with affected municipal and state governments, first responders, and Federal Information Sharing and Analysis Centers ("ISACs").

Step 4: CEO Briefings
The Cyber-Security Strategy developed in Step 3 should include a requirement for regular briefings of the utility's chief executive officer and relevant senior management by cyber security personnel, including updates on newly-identified cyber threats, progress in implementing CIP standards and other mitigation measures, and adaptations to the Strategy to address new threats, vulnerabilities and emerging challenges. Such briefings demonstrate the importance of cyber-security to the rest of the organization and ensure senior management is aware of cyber-related issues. Full awareness of cyber threats should, in turn, help assure the organization is devoting adequate resources to addressing those threats, and build the "culture of compliance" NERC looks for in assessing adherence to Reliability Standards.

Step 5: Legal Review of IT Contracts
The utility should conduct a legal review of its IT equipment and services contracts to ensure compliance with CIP standards, the Security Development Lifecyle guidelines discussed below, the utility's internal Cyber-Security Strategy, and other relevant requirements.

Step 6: Review IT Procurement
The utility should also ensure it is procuring computer software and hardware in a "secure" manner in conformity with Security Development Lifecycle ("SDL") processes and other best practices. Such procurement practices guard against incorporation or introduction of unsafe equipment and malicious software into the utility's computer systems.

Step 7: Procurement Staff Training
Consistent with Steps 5 and 6, the utility's procurement and acquisition staff, as well as its IT security staff, should receive training on SDL and other requirements relevant to IT acquisition and should be given resources sufficient to ensure effective cyber security provisions are incorporated into all IT acquisition contracts.

Step 8: Verify Implementation of Cyber-Related Contract Requirements
To ensure the measures discussed in Steps 5 through 7 are properly implemented, the utility should review its contractual relationships with third party IT service providers to verify that security-related requirements of IT contracts are actually being carried out in conformity with contractual and industry standards. Substandard computer installations and non-conforming contract services can give hackers, cyber-criminals, and cyber-attackers access to critical computer-controlled infrastructure.

Step 9: Use Information Sharing and Analysis Centers ("ISACs")
ISACs (mentioned in Step 3 above) are sector-specific organizations developed voluntarily in cooperation with the Department of Homeland Security to facilitate detection and prevention of cyber-intrusions, vulnerability scanning, penetration testing, and training and education services. The Department of Homeland Security coordinates the flow of information to, from and among fifteen national ISACs. Utility managers and security officials should pay particular attention to ES-ISAC, the ISAC for the electricity sector. Information from other ISACs may also enhance awareness of cyber-threats as well as the tactics, techniques and procedures employed by nefarious actors. These collateral sources include the Multi-State ISAC, which provides cyber threat information and cyber response assistance to state and local governments including utility commissions; the Supply Chain ISAC, which focuses on threats identified in the acquisition/procurement process; the Water ISAC, which provides useful information for water utilities; the Nuclear Energy ISAC, which covers nuclear energy cyber issues; and the Financial Services ISAC, which has information helpful to protecting the financial information of utility customers as well as the utility's own financial information.

Step 10: Develop Disaster Recovery Plans
Most utilities have extensive business continuity and recovery plans that describe how the utility will deal with natural disasters such as earthquakes and major storms. Disaster preparedness also requires development of plans to assure the utility's recovery from a major cyber-attack or series of attacks. The threat of such attacks is so real that a cyber mitigation, response and recovery plan should be the subject of a separate, detailed Annex to the utility's continuity plan. NARUC's Cybersecurity for State Regulators 2.0 (February 2014) provides a comprehensive set of criteria and recommended actions (from a wide variety of sources) for utility commissions to use as assessment tools. These sources and others are helpful in developing an effective Cyber Annex to the utility continuity and recovery plan.

Step 11: Build a Relationship With Law Enforcement
Federal, state and local law enforcement agencies and some state military departments have important roles in identifying cyber intrusions, developing coordinated responses to such intrusions, apprehending or assisting in the apprehension of cyber criminals and recovering from major cyber incidents. Utilities should strive to build strong relationships with these agencies. To be effective, the utility must pre-identify the specific law enforcement officials it will contact in case of a suspected terrorist attack or cyber intrusion. The utility should go beyond the minimum requirement of compiling a contact list to create active, ongoing relationships with the law enforcement officials it will need to rely on in the event of a major cyber-attack.

Step 12: Practice Cyber Incident Responses
As with most utility functions, the adage "practice makes perfect" applies to cyber incident preparedness and cyber incident response. Fortunately, the Department of Homeland Security's "Cyber Storm" program offers excellent opportunities for utilities to participate in a realistic simulation of a major cyber-attack. The Cyber Storm exercise series provides an opportunity for more than 1,000 local entities to participate in a coordinated, week-long national cyber exercise, the results of which are used to develop other progressively challenging exercises and enhance the nation's cyber response systems. Washington utilities such as Snohomish County PUD played an active role in the 2013 Cyber Storm exercise. The next Cyber Storm exercise is scheduled for 2015.

Step 13: Support Your Local Emergency Response Plan
Finally, the utility should determine if its state government has developed a cyber response plan. If a plan exists, the utility at a minimum should become thoroughly familiar with it and, even more important, should offer to participate in the development and continuous testing and refinement of the plan.

The State of Washington, for example, leverages its "cyber security centers of excellence" and lessons learned from Cyber Storm exercises to integrate cyber security planning by state agencies ranging from the Washington Military Department (including its civilian State Emergency Operations Center and Air and Army National Guard cyber operations units) to the Office of the State Chief Information Officer, the Washington State Patrol, the Washington State Fusion Center, the Utilities and Transportation Commission, state universities, municipalities such as the City of Seattle, aerial and maritime port authorities and public utilities. These and other stakeholders, participating as members of a Washington State Cyber Integrated Project Team, have contributed to development, testing and refinement of a Washington State Cyber Incident Annex that is based on the National Cyber Incident Response Plan. The Washington Cyber Incident Annex includes provisions for convening a Cyber Unified Coordination Group to oversee cyber incident responses, which representatives from utilities and other critical infrastructure sectors that could be subject to cyber attack.

CONCLUSION
The conflict between good and evil in Middle Earth was finally resolved when Gollum, still madly clutching the One Ring, falls into the fire at the Cracks of Doom. With the malevolent force of the Ring destroyed, the forces of evil were shorn of their power and collapsed, allowing the hobbits and other peaceful residents of Middle Earth to return to normal life. The moment when the forces of evil in the cyber world will be shorn of their power is a long way off. Until that time comes, dealing with malevolent forces in the cyber domain will be an omnipresent and growing challenge. Because electric power is so critical to the functioning of our modern society, utilities are, willingly or not, thrust into the role of front-line players in the battle for control of cyberspace. The thirteen steps described above, if implemented, will help utilities protect their own assets, and help secure the nation against potentially crippling cyber attacks.

LEO Still Roars: FERC Declares Montana PURPA Rules Illegal

March 21, 2014

After the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission's ("FERC") recent lawsuit against the Idaho Public Utilities Commission ended in something of a whimper, many industry observers speculated that FERC would retreat from aggressively challenging states that attempt to unduly restrict the rights of power sellers on the Public Utility Regulatory Policies Act of 1978 ("PURPA"). A long-awaiting FERC decision, issued yesterday, suggests this speculation may have been premature. The decision declares that Montana's PURPA program, which requires many PURPA-eligible projects to win irregularly-scheduled competitive bidding processes and also imposes a 50-MW limit on wind generation acquired under PURPA, does not comply with FERC's "legally enforceable obligation" or "LEO" rules. Hydrodynamics, Inc., 146 FERC P 61,193 (issued March 20, 2104).

The controversy centers on how to interpret PURPA's basic mandate, which requires utilities to purchase power from PURPA-eligible generators, called "Qualifying Facilities" or "QFs", at avoided-cost rates. Generally, QFs are small, renewable generators owned by independent power producers. The law was designed to help non-utility developers overcome barriers to entry in the power generation market created by vertically-integrated utility monopolies. Hence, a basic requirement of FERC's PURPA rules is that, if an independent producer presents a utility with a PURPA-eligible contract, it creates a LEO, requiring the utility to honor the contract, even if the utility refuses to sign the contract. This prevents utilities from defeating PURPA's intent by dragging their feet on signing contracts that otherwise meet all PURPA requirements.

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Transmission Terrorism: As Details of Substation Attack Come to Light, Senators Call for Action

February 7, 2014

Just before 1 a.m. on April 16, 2013, as-yet unidentified assailants launched an attack on the Metcalf substation in Silicon Valley. The attack lasted nearly an hour, disabling ten high-voltage transformers and three high-voltage transformer banks. Occurring just hours after the Boston Marathon bombings, the attack garnered little press coverage at the time and, as a federal investigation dragged on, details were slow to emerge. Beginning with an article published in Foreign Policy magazine in late 2013, information suggesting that the attack may have been the work of terrorists rather than vandals has started to come to light. In response to these revelations, group of four U.S. Senators today sent a letter to federal regulators calling for swift action to address the threat.

Earlier this week, the Wall Street Journal published a long article providing many details of the attack. In the article, former Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Chairman Jon Wellinghoff noted several pieces of evidence suggesting that the attack was carefully orchestrated. For example, before the attack began, someone lifted a large cover off an underground vault and cut communications cables, knocking out communications in the area around the substation and interfering with emergency response. More than 100 empty shell cases, likely from AK-47 assault rifles, were found in the area around the substation. None had fingerprints and military experts found small piles of rocks that may have been left by an advance scout to mark the best vantage points for the attack. The number of shell cases and the fact that the vault cover probably could not have been lifted by a single person suggest that multiple individuals were involved in the attack. Many of these details were corroborated in subsequent accounts from media outlets such as National Public Radio and Bay Area newspapers.

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Western PURPA War Update: Retreats, Advances, But Little Clarity

February 4, 2014

As we discussed last summer, the expansion of renewable energy generation, especially wind generation, has produced an escalating conflict between the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission ("FERC") and several Western states over the application of the Public Utility Regulatory Policies Act ("PURPA"). In recent months, at least one major conflict has been resolved, while other conflicts continue to develop. While future developments may depend upon whether newly-nominated FERC Chairman Norman Bay adopts the aggressive enforcement policy of his predecessor, Jon Wellinghoff, recent action provides some hints as to the future legal landscape.

PURPA is a 1978 law that, among other requirements, mandates that utilities purchase power produced by smaller renewable generators. Recent conflicts have arisen over PURPA's basic mandate, which requires utilities to purchase power from PURPA-eligible generators, called "Qualifying Facilities" or "QFs", at avoided-cost rates. Conflicts have also arisen from efforts to square PURPA with recent industry developments, such as ownership of Renewable Energy Credits and integration of variable renewable resources..

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